Dec 01 2019

C. Diff…an old bacterium with new problems.

Published by under probiotic supplements

C. Diff…an old bacterium with new problems.
One type of Colitis called C-Difficile is on the rise. Why? And what can be done?*

To continue our series on colitis, we must give attention to one type of colitis that is the major cause of infectious diarrhea in the United States and that is Clostridium Difficile, also known as C Diff. It affects nearly half a million people in the U.S. every year. “…Contrary to the popular belief that C. difficile is typically a hospital-acquired infection, recent studies have revealed that approximately 41% of the infections caused by C. difficile are community-acquired…” Each year, twenty-nine thousand people die within a month of diagnosis and 15,000 people die of the C. Difficile infection. While it can show up without an apparent reason, it often strikes people after they have received antibiotics for another infection.  When this happens, their immune system and microbiome get compromised and thus lay the groundwork for C. Diff to move in. (12)*

“…Scientists discovered C. diff in 1935, but they didn’t recognize it as the major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea until 1978. The rise of C. diff in the 1970s was triggered by the widespread use of the antibiotic clindamycin. Over the next 20 years, broad-spectrum antibiotics continued to fuel the C. diff epidemic…”1*

Our bodies are made up of approximately 10 trillion cells — and each of us plays host to about 100 trillion bacterial cells with 500-1000 bacterial species living in the digestive tract. Most of these bacteria are harmless with a healthy person having a ratio of approximately 80% good bacteria to 20% unfriendly. Together they create a healthy gut and strong immune system. In the colon, these bacteria are harmless and actually contribute to our health, by stimulating the immune system, producing vitamin K and aiding in the establishment of the proper balance between its components. They detoxify harmful chemicals and crowd out such pathogens as C. Diff. 1*

So why and how did C. Diff become such a problem? The answer is something we have sadly come to know, and that is antibiotics. While antibiotics target aggressive bacteria that cause serious infection, they lay waste on the microbiome, often wiping out all the good bacteria as well…those that keep our bodies healthy. “…When normal intestinal bacteria are wiped out by antibiotics, a void is created and in too many cases, C. diff steps in to fill the void. This especially happens with those who are hospitalized and already have weakened immune systems and are not prepared to withstand the stress of diarrhea and fever…”1*

What exactly is C. diff?

 “…C. diff is classified as an anaerobic bacterium because it thrives in the absence of oxygen. Like its cousins, the Clostridia that cause tetanus, botulism, and gas gangrene, C. diff passes through a life cycle in which the actively dividing form transforms itself into the spore stage. Spores are inert and metabolically inactive, so they don’t cause disease. At the same time, though, spores are very tough and sturdy; they are hard to kill with disinfectants, and they shrug off even the most powerful antibiotics…”1*

  1. diff spreads because patients with C. diff shed spores through their feces. “…The primary mode of disease transmission is the fecal-oral route…” In facilities, where many patients are cohabitating, spores can be transmitted through utensils, hands, and food, and they are swallowed by another patient. Now, in the second patient’s GI tract, the spores come to life. In a healthy person, the good bacterial or healthy balance of bacteria keeps the C. diff bacterium in check without consequences. But if they entered the system of a patient who has been compromised due to antibiotic therapy or illness, C. diff sees an opportunity to grow. As it multiplies, it produces toxins known as toxins A and B, which cause damage to the colon lining. This results in diarrhea and inflammation. “…Ordinary strains of C. diff produce two toxins, called toxins A and B, but the new, worrisome hypervirulent strains produce up to 16 times more toxin A and 23 times more toxin B…” (1,2)*

While any antibiotic can pave the way for C. diff, it is the antibiotics that more severely affect the intestinal tract. Clindamycin is the most common, but other antibiotics include such broad-spectrum antibiotics as penicillins, cephalosporins, and fluoroquinolones. Anti-ulcer medications in the proton-pump inhibitor family may also increase vulnerability because stomach acid helps battle  C. diff.1*

Symptoms range from mild to severe, and can even be life-threatening. The wide range of symptoms is classified as CDAD which stands for Clostridium difficile–associated disease. Health care professionals can identify it by its odor, but more precise testing is mandatory. The standard way to diagnose CDAD is to detect C. diff toxins in the patient’s feces.1*

If an antibiotic led to CDAD, the first step is to stop that therapy which is difficult if a patient needs that particular treatment for something else going on in the body. The next step is to administer an antibiotic that will kill C. diff. In most mild to moderate cases, C. diff. infections respond well to two drugs, fidaxomicin or vancomycin. But some patients recover slowly, and relapse is not uncommon. Many health professionals cautions against giving medication to slow diarrhea, as it is the body’s attempt to get rid of the C. diff. Dehydration is a big concern, so that needs to be watched. In cases of severe CDAD, dramatic intervention may take place. In the case of toxic megacolon which is life-threatening, complete removal of the colon may be required.1*

How to prevent C. diff and its spread

Because C. diff moves in when the microbiome is compromised, it is imperative to keep the gut balanced. Supplementing on a daily basis with Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ is one way to help crowd out unfriendly bacteria, and fortify the gut so that C. diff. can’t move in. 1*

  1. diffs is preventable but a prompt diagnosis is important in order for the proper to be taken to isolate the spores before it spreads. In hospitals and long term care facilities, the patient should be in a private room and not share bathroom facilities. Staff should take measures to wash their hands, use gloves and gowns, and remove when leaving the room. C. diff spores resist alcohol-based hand cleansers so soap and water is needed for handwashing, but even soap won’t kill the spores but scrubbing well can remove many of them. C. diff spores can survive on dry surfaces for weeks and even months, so all surfaces in a patient’s room require special care and hypochlorite-based solutions seem to work best. At home, kitchen and bathroom surfaces and fixtures should be cleaned with a bleach and water solution.1*

Because antibiotics are the culprit when it comes to C. diff., antibiotics should only be used when absolutely necessary, with the most narrowly focused drug being used for the shortest amount of time possible. Taking  Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ regularly, when you are healthy, and increasing dosage when you feel something coming on will keep your immune system and your microbiome strong and healthy. Colitis in general and C. Diff specifically are not something to mess around with and we want to avoid at all costs. Take good care and follow preventative measures.

Healthiest wishes,

Kelli

www.bodybiotics.com

 

Resources:

  1. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/clostridium-difficile-an-intestinal-infection-on-the-rise
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK431054/

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Nov 24 2019

Ulcerative Colitis – Part 2

Ulcerative Colitis…what it is and what can be done – Part 2

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, including Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease, are particularly perplexing forms of Colitis.

During our last blog, we started our series on Colitis. We covered the different types of colitis, the symptoms and how to determine if it is time to seek medical care.

One of the most commonly diagnosed types of colitis is Ulcerative colitis. It is one of two conditions classified as an Inflammatory Bowel Disease with the other being Crohn’s Disease. These two conditions can be particularly frustrating because their causes are often unknown and those suffering have to deal with them their whole life. It occurs when the immune system overreacts to bacteria and other particles in the digestive tract, yet health experts can’t pinpoint why this happens. (1,2)*

Ulcerative Colitis is a chronic inflammation of the inner lining of the colon that can cause the tissue to break down, resulting in the formation of ulcerations along the colon. Depending on the type, it can involve the entire colon or only parts of it. “…The common types of Ulcerative Colitis include proctosigmoiditis, which affects the rectum and lower portion of the colon, left-sided colitis, which affects the left side of the colon beginning at the rectum and pancolitis, which affects the entire large intestine…” (1,2)*

Ulcerative colitis in almost all cases requires some form of treatment. Unlike other forms of colitis that are caused by external influences such as bacteria, antibiotics, chemicals, chemotherapy, etc., ulcerative colitis is believed to be caused by a genetic mutation that allows bad bacteria to irritate the intestine. While the exact cause of ulcerative colitis is unknown, it is believed to be related to abnormal immunologic reactions by the body to normal bacteria that typically reside in the colon. The body’s immune system reacts by attacking the colon which causes inflammation.1*

“…Ulcerative colitis is a disease that occurs in developed nations and is more common in cities than in the countryside. Approximately 700,000 people in the U.S. suffer from ulcerative colitis. Individuals with ulcerative colitis usually develop the disease between ages 15 and 25 although the disease may begin at any age. There seems to be a genetic component since ulcerative colitis is more common among relatives of individuals with ulcerative colitis. Caucasians and individuals of eastern European Jewish descent are more likely to develop ulcerative colitis…”1*

Crohn’s disease, another form of inflammatory bowel disease, is different in that it is not isolated to the colon. Crohn’s disease most often usually involves the small intestine, sometimes the small intestine and colon and then sometimes just the colon. Both Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are chronic gastrointestinal disorders with the symptoms of abdominal pain and diarrhea with the cause being dysfunction of the nerves and muscles of the intestines with no identifiable inflammation.1*

What are the warming signs?

The main symptoms caused by ulcerative colitis are abdominal pain and diarrhea, usually bloody. Ulcerative colitis can fluctuate in terms of severity over time, with symptoms going from mild to severe and back to mild. It can even “burn out” over time and become inactive. If not controlled, the chronic inflammation and symptoms of ulcerative colitis can affect the patient’s nutritional intake, leading to weight loss and a decreased rate of growth in children.(1,2)*

How to determine if you have Ulcerative Colitis

The best way to determine if ulcerative colitis is present is with a colonoscopy. It can also be diagnosed with a barium enema, which is a procedure that takes X-rays of a barium-filled colon, but the colonoscopy is more effective at identifying lower levels of inflammation and scarring left from the ulcers. Additionally, during a colonoscopy, biopsies can be taken from the lining of the colon which helps confirm the diagnosis.1*

In cases of severe flare-ups, it is necessary to seek treatment so as to avoid scary complications. One such complication is bleeding that can be so severe it leads to anemia. The colon can also dilate to the point that it stops working. Without treatment, the colon can rupture and this is a medical emergency that requires surgery. Unsuccessful surgery can lead to the removal of the colon altogether. 1*

 Another risk of ulcerative colitis is that it puts people at an increased risk for colon cancer, with that risk increases the longer the duration and the extent of the disease. Prevention includes annual screening via colonoscopy in which biopsies can be taken to detect precancerous cells early so that portions of the colon can be removed surgically before cancer develops. 1*

Other complications in other parts of the body can result from having ulcerative colitis. Inflammation can lead to arthritis of the spine and large joints, skin ulcerations may occur and it can lead to a serious liver disease called sclerosing cholangitis, which happens in a small number of people. All of these complications are associated with inflammation and the immune system.1*

There are several treatments for ulcerative colitis all aiming to reduce the inflammation in the colon. While there are several drug treatments commonly prescribed, let’s look at how Probiotics can help those with Ulcerative Colitis. *

Probiotics work in various ways. They act as a barrier by lining the intestinal tract and when taken regularly, prevent other bacteria from reaching and penetrating the mucosal immune system. Probiotics also enhance mucus production, helping produce a thicker mucus layer, which protects against invasive bacteria. They also can alter the consistency of the mucus, thereby “…changing bacterial adherence patterns…” 3*

Additionally, “…probiotics cause the mucosal immune system in the patient’s intestinal tract to secrete protective immunoglobulins (Ig) such as secretory IgA and a host of protective defensins and bacteriocins into the lumen. Finally, probiotics alter the function of the mucosal immune system to make it more anti-inflammatory and less pro-inflammatory; specifically, probiotics can stimulate dendritic cells to make them slightly less responsive and slightly less reactive to bacteria within the lumen. This latter mechanism appears to be particularly important in ulcerative colitis (UC). Working via these mechanisms, probiotics can downregulate the effects of luminal bacteria in initiating and sustaining an intestinal inflammatory response…”3*

Because Ulcerative Colitis is believed to be the result of an underlying genetic mutation that allows  “…aggressive luminal bacteria to initiate a mucosal inflammatory response that is never terminated…” the rationale is that Probiotics help change the existing bacteria so that it is not as aggressive and more anti-inflammatory. The second thought is that Ulcerative Colitis is a mucosal disease, so a therapy that works at the level of the mucosa should be beneficial. Research has been done on probiotic bacteria similar to the strains found in Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™. Probiotics showed to be effective for inducing remission and maintaining a benefit over 24 weeks. More research needs to be done, but multiple studies have concluded that certain strains of bacteria can help prevent a relapse of the symptoms of Ulcerative Colitis. (3,4)*

Drugs used to treat Ulcerative Colitis

Commonly prescribed drugs for Ulcerative Colitis are anti inflammatory  drugs such as aminosalicylates, which are related to aspirin. If those are not effective, corticosteroids are used. Lastly,  immunomodulators, which lower the immune response aim to reduce inflammation. These drugs can take weeks to months for maximum benefit to be realized. 1*

Biologic Therapies

Another recent treatment for ulcerative colitis is biologic therapy. Antibodies target inflammation-causing molecules produced by the immune system. These antibodies are administered intravenously every few weeks. The one used most often is directed against a protein called tumor necrosis factor, which is produced by the immune system.1*

Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis

Despite drug therapies, approximately one-third of people with ulcerative colitis will need to undergo surgery to treat the inflammation, prevent or treat cancer, or to treat complications such as the rupture of the colon. Surgery in which the entire colon is removed cures the person of their ulcerative colitis. Medical advancements have made it so that patients are not always left with ileostomies, (external bags into which the small intestine emptied). Instead, surgical techniques have been developed that allow the colon to be removed without the need for an ileostomy.1*

Helminth or Whipworm Therapy

A far out sounding, but possibly promising observation by some researchers is that the pig whipworm could be an effective treatment for ulcerative colitis. “…Scientists believe that the worms that inhabit the colon alter the immune response reduce the inflammation. In one study, 43% of patients with ulcerative colitis improved after ingesting pig whipworm eggs for 12 weeks. The impetus for investigating treatment with the whipworm came from the observation that ulcerative colitis was not common in developing countries where intestinal parasitic diseases are common…” This may be worth exploring further and possibly in a future blog.(1,5)*

I hope this information has been helpful. The more we know, and the more steps we take daily for prevention, such as taking Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ to protect our health, the better. Staying informed and ahead of problems before they get worse, is a big part of this.*

Healthiest wishes,

Kelli

www.bodybiotics.com

Resources:

  1. https://www.webmd.com/ibd-crohns-disease/ulcerative-colitis/ulcerative-colitis-probiotics-prebiotics#1
  2. https://www.healthline.com/health/colitis#types-and-causes
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3033537/
  4. https://greatist.com/health/probiotics-for-ulcerative-colitis#do-probiotics-help
  5. https://undark.org/2016/12/20/helminths-ibs-worm-parasite-auto-immune/
  6. https://inflammatoryboweldisease.net › what-is-crohns-disease › statistics

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Nov 17 2019

The Condition called Colitis: Part 1

Published by under probiotic supplements

The Condition called Colitis: Part 1

Many people suffer from this condition that has causes that are somewhat elusive.

Over the next few weeks, we are going to examine the condition called Colitis, which affects many people around the globe. Colitis is an inflammation of the colon, also referred to as the large intestine. It affects approximately 1.6 million Americans in some shape or form, primarily as Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Out of the 1.6 million people affected, 780,000 of them have Crohn’s disease and approximately 907,000 have Ulcerative Colitis. Approximately 6 to 15 new cases per 100,000 people each year are diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. (1,2)*

There are many different forms of colitis, including Infectious colitis, Ischemic colitis, Ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s colitis, Microscopic Colitis, Diversion Colitis. Lymphocytic Colitis, Atypical Colitis, Fulminant Colitis, Collagenous Colitis, Chemical Colitis, and pseudomembranous colitis. Depending on the type, Colitis can be a temporary condition, or it can affect a person for years. In the more serious conditions, the causes can be unknown, with researchers trying to find the answers. (1,2)

Generally, the signs of colitis include abdominal pain, tenderness in the abdominal area, rapid weight loss, achy joints, loss of appetite and fatigue, or frequent, small bowel movements. In many cases, diarrhea is present, but in other cases there may be constipation. Blood in the stool is also common. 2*

 Types and Causes

 Not all forms of colitis are the same. What causes it varies just as the type of colitis people have varies. Understanding the cause helps to determine the treatment plan.

Infectious Colitis

Perhaps the most common type of colitis is infectious colitis, which is caused by viruses and bacteria entering the intestine. Usually a foodborne illness or food poisoning from salmonella, E. coli., shigella and Campylobacter cause it. These infections can cause diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, and serious dehydration.  Infectious diarrhea can also be caused by parasites from dirty water such as giardia which can affect both humans and pets. This can be from dirty drinking water, lakes, rivers and swimming pools. When your mother said, “don’t drink the water” there was a good reason!3*

Another type of infectious colitis is pseudomembranous colitis which is caused when antibiotic use has altered the delicate balance of the microbiome and there is an overgrowth of clostridium difficile or C. Diff.  This bacteria produces a toxin that causes diarrhea. While the diarrhea is usually not bloody, dehydration and fever can occur.   C. diff is helped with a strong regimen of Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ to repopulate the gut with friendly bacteria. (2,3)*

Ischemic Colitis

Just like other arteries in the body, the arteries that supply blood to the colon can become narrow as the result of atherosclerosis. Just like narrowing blood vessels in the heart can lead to angina, or narrowed blood vessels in the brain can cause a stroke, these arteries can restrict blood supply to the colon causing it to become inflamed and irritated. This same condition can occur as a result of a condition called volvulus, in which the bowel twists itself or there is an incarcerated hernia, in which a section of the colon gets trapped in an “outpouching” of the abdominal wall. These conditions can prevent blood from flowing to the affected portion of the colon. In these cases, ischemic colitis can occur. The result is serious pain, bloody bowel movements, and fever. 3*

Blood clots can also decrease blood flow to the bowel if they travel or embolize and block an artery to the colon.  “…Individuals who have the common heart rhythm disturbance, atrial fibrillation, are at risk of forming small clots in the heart, which break off and block the blood supply to the bowel. This is the same mechanism that can cause a stroke or TIA (transient ischemic attack) if the blockage occurs in an artery that supplies the brain…”*3*

Microscopic Colitis

This uncommon condition known as Collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis occurs mainly in older women. While the cause is unknown, the autoimmune condition is the primary suspect. Known as microscopic colitis, the colon wall gets engorged with either lymphocytes or collagen causing it to get inflamed. The symptoms are watery, non-bloody diarrhea. 3*

 Chemical Colitis

Inflammation and damage can occur when chemicals are entered into the colon as in an enema. Inflammation of the mucosal lining of the colon is the result. 3*

Medication-associated colitis

Some prescription drugs as well as over the counter drugs can cause colitis. NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), retinoic acid, mycophenolate, and ipilimumab are among the culprits. Ask your doctor if you are experiencing symptoms of colitis if you are on any of these drugs. 3*

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Colitis

Inflammatory bowel disease falls into two categories…ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease.

Thought to be an autoimmune disease, ulcerative colitis happens when the body’s own immune system attacks the colon, causing inflammation and small ulcers all along the colon. It begins in the rectum and can gradually spread throughout the colon. Abdominal pain and bloody bowel movements are the symptoms.

Crohn’s disease on the other hand, can involve any part of the digestive tract. It can start from the mouth, esophagus and stomach, and go through to the small and large intestine all the way to the rectum and anus. It has diseased areas known as skip lesions, which are interspersed throughout the digestive tract with healthy areas of tissue. (1,3)*

Symptoms

The symptoms of colitis vary depending on the type of colitis a person has, but generally, colitis is associated with abdominal pain and diarrhea. Symptoms may also include bloody diarrhea, , constipation, and cramping, Additionally, the constant urge to have a bowel movement, fever, chills and other signs of infection may also be present. In serious cases, loss of weight, fatigue, and fever are the result. 1,3)*

When to seek the help of a health care professional   

When it comes to the internal mechanisms of the body, it is important to seek the help of a health care professional for both preventative care (colonoscopy screening) and more specifically a gastroenterologist or internal medicine specialist if you think you have colitis. A diagnosis of colitis can be determined through a physical exam, reviewing patient history, a colonoscopy, laboratory and imaging tests. 1,3)*

Colonoscopies are an important way to screen diseases and conditions of the colon. It can help get a better picture, literally of the colon. Biopsies of the colon lining can be done to detect microscopic colitis and also to for cancer screening. If detected early, colon cancer is very treatable with great survival rates. Unfortunately, people put this important test off too often. “…Colonoscopy is an essential cancer screening test and is especially important for those patients who have had blood in their stool that can’t be explained by another diagnosis…”3*

A CT scan, or computerized tomography, can also be used to take an image of the colon and the rest of the abdomen. Different types of colitis have distinctive patterns that may help a radiologist recognize a specific diagnosis. 3*

If you are suffering from any of the following, it is important to seek medical care::

  • persistent diarrhea, (most bouts of diarrhea resolve themselves after a few hours…if it persists, there may be a problem)
  • blood in the stool
  • significant and lasting pain in the abdomen.
  • Signs of dehydration (decreased or dark urination, weakness, dizziness. dry eyes, mouth and skin.
  • fever, 1,3)*

What Is the Outlook for a Person With Colitis?

Understanding the causes of each type of colitis has led to a more targeted approach to therapy. Next time we will look at the treatment options for each type of colitis and steps for prevention.  In the meantime, we know that replenishing the digestive tract with healthy bacteria is key to prevention and remission for all types of colitis. So continue on with  Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ in order to keep the gut populated with the healthy bacteria we need for a strong immune system and to maintain a healthy digestive tract. 

Healthiest wishes,

Kelli

www.bodybiotics.com

 

Resources:

  1. https://inflammatoryboweldisease.net › what-is-crohns-disease › statistics
  2. https://www.gwhospital.com/conditions-services/digestive-disorder-center/colitis
  3. https://www.emedicinehealth.com/colitis/article_em.htm
  4. https://gut.bmj.com/content/54/7/898

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Oct 06 2019

Is it Time for a gut check?

Published by under probiotic supplements

Time for a gut check?
Evaluate the choices you make to ensure you are keeping your microbiome healthy.   

As we know, having a healthy microbiome is key to good health and a strong immune system. It takes a daily commitment to stay on track by eating right, exercising, sleeping well and avoiding poor lifestyle choices. With full schedules, work, families and more, we don’t always remember or have the time or energy to make the healthiest choices for ourselves and our families. Today’s blog is about doing a “gut check” and making sure we are all on track.

Keeping our guts healthy is essential for overall health and a strong immune system. The friendly microbes are important for healthy digestion. They destroy harmful bacteria and other microorganisms, produce vitamin K, folate and short-chain fatty acids. When our microbiome contains more bad bacteria then good, an imbalance occurs, This condition, called gut dysbiosis, leads to a plethora of conditions. We are more prone to a variety of infections and other illness. Our brains get  foggy, we can feel lethargic and depressed. Imbalanced gut bacteria and dysbiosis have been connected to weight gain, inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation throughout the body, insulin resistance, obesity and colorectal cancer. An unhealthy gut is at the core of an array of health problems.  All roads lead from the gut, and an unhealthy gut will make us sick, while a healthy gut will keep us well.. (1,2)*

So how healthy is your gut? Are you doing the right things to keep it healthy? Let’s review:

How diverse is your diet?

When we become creatures of habit, grabbing what is easy and eating the same things all the time (and maybe not so healthy), the gut microbes become less diverse..3*

A diet consisting of a wide variety of whole foods, such as whole grains, vegetables and fruits, can lead to a more diverse gut flora. The food you eat provides nutrients that help bacteria grow, so the more diverse the healthy foods, the more variety of nutrients help promote different types of bacteria to grow..3*

Over the past 50 years, the Western diet has become less diverse. “…Today, 75% of the world’s food supply comes from only 12 plants and five animal species…” Studies show that people who reside in rural regions of Africa and South America have a more diverse gut flora than those living in the US and Europe, as their diets are richer in fiber and include a wider  variety of plant protein sources.4*

Have you taken Antibiotics?

While antibiotics are effective in treating infections such as urinary tract infections and strep throat, they do take a toll on the flora residing in the gut. While they kill bacteria or prevent them from multiplying, they harm not only the bad, but also wipe out the good bacteria. Just one round of antibiotics can result in harmful changes to the composition and diversity of the gut flora. Antibiotics cause a short term decline in beneficial bacteria like Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli and can increase harmful bacteria like clostridium.  Multiple rounds of antibiotics can really take a toll. Once a round of antibiotics is completed, most bacteria return after 1-4 weeks, but the numbers don’t often return to previous levels. Once you complete a round of antibiotics, take and increased dose of Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ to replenish lost populations.

Take your Probiotics daily

This brings us to the importance of replenishing the friendly critters that we don’t get in our diets whether it is due to a less diverse diet, or because the soils are not as rich in natural Probiotics like they used to be before industrial farming took hold, We must replenish our guts with the friendly microbes they need. Taking Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ is designed for that purpose. When you feel run down or are feeling a canker sore or yeast infection coming on, up your dose. These are all signs that your gut microbes are out of balance. 

Add plenty of Prebiotics

Prebiotics are essential for a healthy gut and for a diverse microbiome. Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ contains prebiotics in the form of humic and fulvic acid. Additionally, we need to also eat plenty of both soluble and non soluble fiber. It is the non soluble fiber that passes through the body undigested and promotes the growth and activity of friendly gut bacteria. You can get your fiber by eating plenty of  fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds and beans, which naturally contain prebiotic fiber.

Foods that are high in fiber are and serve as prebiotics are:

  • Asparagus
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • Oats
  • Lentils, chickpeas and beans
  • onions
  • nuts
  • Bananas
  • Garlic
  • Leeks (1,5)*

Don’t drink too much alcohol.

When consumed in large amounts, alcohol is highly toxic and can have harmful physical and mental effects, including gut dysbiosis. 6*

A study comparing the gut flora of 41 alcoholics to 10 healthy individuals who consumed little-to-no alcohol showed  dysbiosis was present in 27% of the alcoholic population, while it was not in any of the healthy individuals. 6*

Another study compared the effects of three different types of alcohol on gut health.”…For 20 days, each individual consumed 9.2 ounces (272 ml) of red wine, the same amount of de-alcoholized red wine or 3.4 ounces (100 ml) of gin each day Gin decreased the number of beneficial gut bacteria, whereas red wine actually increased the abundance of bacteria known to promote gut health and decreased the number of harmful gut bacteria like Clostridium …”  The benefits of moderate red wine drinking on the microbiome seems to be because of the polyphenol content in the grapes skins. 7*

A third study. showed that consuming red wine can significantly influence the growth of certain microbes, which suggests “…possible prebiotic benefits associated with the inclusion of red wine polyphenols in the diet…” Polyphenols are plant compounds that escape digestion and are broken down by gut bacteria. They may also help reduce blood pressure and improve cholesterol 7*

Get Physical

 We know it, we hear it everywhere so let’s say it once more for good measure. Physical activity, whether it be walking, running, dancing or gardening, has health benefits that include losing weight, lowering stress and reducing the risk of chronic disease and  also improves gut health, according to recent studies. *

Cigarettes are just bad for you.

Tobacco smoke harms nearly every organ in your body with its thousands of chemicals, (70 of which can cause cancer). Smoking raises the risk of lung cancer, heart disease and stroke and is also one of the most environmentally risky factors for inflammatory bowel disease, which is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s disease, which is a common type of inflammatory bowel disease,  is also twice as likely in smokers. Giving up smoking can increase gut flora diversity.8*

Get lots of consistent Zzzzs

Sleeping, and sleeping well is essential to good gut health and overall health. Disrupting the body’s time clock can have an effect on gut health as shown in a 2016 study which explored the effects of short-term sleep deprivation on the composition of gut flora. The study compared the effects of two nights of sleep deprivation (about 4 hours per night) versus two nights of normal sleep duration (8.5 hours) in nine men. “…Two days of sleep deprivation caused subtle changes to the gut flora and increased the abundance of bacteria associated with weight gain, obesity, type 2 diabetes and fat metabolism. (1,10)*

Try not to Stress

Stress can alter gut microbes by increasing sensitivity and reducing blood flow in the gut. Mice studies have shown that certain stressors can affect the microbiome. “…Stress exposure in mice also affects bacterial populations, causing an increase in potentially harmful bacteria like Clostridium and reducing beneficial populations of bacteria like lactobacilli…” Another study, which involved 23 college students, examined the composition of their gut bacteria at the beginning and end of the school semester. They observed that the high stress associated with final exams caused a reduction in friendly bacteria, including Lactobacilli….”11*

Easy reminders for improving and maintaining good gut health:

  • Eat plenty of foods rich in prebiotic fibers, such as legumes, onions, asparagus, oats, bananas and others.
  • Take your probiotics 
  • Make time for quality sleep and try to go to bed and wake up at the same time each day.
  • Reduce stress through regular exercise and other relaxation techniques.
  • Check your lifestyle choices and use alcohol in moderation. If you’re going to drink, moderately consume red wine which is high in Avoid smoking and stay active.

Healthiest wishes,

Kelli

www.bodybiotics.com

Resources:

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/8-things-that-harm-gut-bacteria#section11
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27110483
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20679230
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23609775
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3362077/
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22552027
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2598752
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3180011/
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5123208/
  10. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301051107001597

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    Sep 22 2019

    Where have all the fish gone?

    Published by under General

    Where have all the fish gone?

    Industrial fishing practices and consumer demand are changing the landscape of our oceans.

    Last time we talked about our oceans and the impact that overfishing has had on the amount of wildlife found there. Where it seems that the oceans are endless, industrial fishing has depleted the oceans just as industrial farming has depleted our soils. Fish can’t reproduce fast enough to keep up with the demand, and this is going to have a  long term, negative effect on all of us if we don’t act now 1*

    As the bigger fish disappear, fisherman go for the smaller catch – those fish that act as food for the bigger fish. If we deplete these also, it will negatively impact the entire food chain. Fish are an important food to include in our diets due to their high levels of naturally occurring omega 3 fatty acids. But if we don’t choose wisely, we are contributing to this problem of over fishing, and also could be consuming seafood high in mercury and other pollutants.1*

    The industry is paying attention to this problem due to the help of researchers and largely due other research done through the world renowned Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, California, *The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch®  program “…empowers both consumers and businesses to make good choices which will result in healthier oceans and diverse marine ecosystems for years to come…” Many fishing practices are changing due to this research, and one such practice is known as Aquaculture. (1,2)*

    Fish farming has actually been practiced for hundreds of years in some parts of the world. Today, half of the seafood we eat in the US is farmed. Aquaculture is a fast growing facet of in the global market, all in order to meet the growing global demand for seafood When good practices are used, farming seafood can  have  very little impact on the environment which can limit habitat damage, disease, escapes of farmed fish and the use of wild fish as feed but there are many cases where this has not been the case and regulatory authorities are working to make sure of good practices..(1,2)                                           

    *“…In the next decade, the majority of fish we eat will be farm-raised, not wild. Global aquaculture includes over 100 species, farmed in everything from traditional earthen ponds to high-tech tank systems. Each farming system has its own distinct environmental footprint. By choosing seafood from better farms and production systems, consumers can play a positive role in reducing aquaculture’s potential negative impact…”(1,2)                                                                                                                        

    Seafood Watch® uses science-based, peer review methods to assess “…how fisheries and farmed seafood impact the environment and provides recommendations indicating which items are “Best Choices” “Good Alternatives,” and which ones to “Avoid.”…” Through its app, pocket guides and, website, Seafood Watch® is creating awareness. It also partners with businesses, culinary leaders, aquariums and zoos to bring this issue to the consumer. Through their recommendations, they help us, as consumers to choose “…seafood that’s fished or farmed in ways that have less impact on the environment…”(1,2,3)*                                                                                                                                                                                      

    Seek out the Sustainable (by referring to Seafood Watch®

    Some sources of seafood are more sustainable than others. Farm raised oysters, clams and mussels are an excellent choice with most oysters, and many clams and mussels on the U.S. market being farm-raised. They don’t require supplemental feeding and can improve water quality! Sadly, two of our  most popular seafood items in the US, shrimp and tuna,  are among the worst choices when caught in the wild by commercial methods with their capture having some of the greatest impacts on incidentally-caught animals. 3*

    Support restaurants who are Restaurant Partners. (Listed on the Monterey Bay Aquarium website).

    These restaurants have agreed to no longer serve items from the red or Avoid list. They also educate their staff to create and raise awareness about sustainable seafood in their communities.3*

    Ask the question: ”Do you sell sustainable seafood?”                                                                                                               By asking this simple but important question at your grocery store or restaurant, you can help shape the demand and supply for fish that’s been caught or farmed in environmentally responsible ways. When chatting with the sushi chef, let them know it is important to you and find out where they get their fish. Ask if the seafood is farmed or wild, how it was caught and where it’s from.3*

    Download the Seafood Watch® App from the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

    Here you can find recommendations for sustainable seafood choices based on where you live, a place you are traveling to, or nationwide. You can visit their website to download their pocketsize printable guide or download the Seafood Watch App from iTunes or Google Play.3*

    Seafood Watch Ratings                                                                     Best Choices are those fish varieties that cause little harm to habitats and are well-managed.   The Good Alternatives list present some concerns with how they are farmed or caught, and should be consumed in limited amounts.

    Avoid list are the varieties which are overfished or farmed or caught in ways that damage the environment and other marine life.3*

    On the Best Choice list are:

    Abalone (farmed)

    Arctic Char (farmed)

    Barramundi (US & Vietnam farmed)

    Bass (US hooks and lines, farmed)

    Catfish (US)

    Clams, Cockles, Mussels

    Cod: Pacific (AK)

    Crab: King, Snow & Tanner (AK)

    Lionfish (US)

    Lobster: Spiny (Mexico)

    Oysters (farmed & Canada)

    Prawn (Canada & US)

    Rockfish (AK, CA, OR & WA)

    Sablefish/Black Cod (AK)

    Salmon (New Zealand)

    Sand dab (CA, OR & WA)

    Scallops (farmed)

    Shrimp (US farmed)

    Squid (US)

    Tilapia (Canada, Ecuador, Peru & US)

    Trout (US farmed)

    Tuna: Albacore (trolls, pole and lines)

    Tuna: Skipjack (Pacific trolls, pole and lines) 3*

    On the Avoid List are:

    Basa/Pangasius/Swai

    Cod: Atlantic (gillnet, longline, trawl)

    Cod: Pacific (Japan & Russia)

    Crab (Argentina, Asia & Russia)

    Halibut: Atlantic (wild)

    Lobster: Spiny (Belize, Brazil, Honduras & Nicaragua)

    Mahi Mahi (imported)

    Orange Roughy

    Octopus (other imported sources)

    Pollock (Canada trawls & Russia)

    Salmon (Canada Atlantic, Chile, Norway & Scotland)

    Sardines: Atlantic (Mediterranean)

    Sharks

    Shrimp (other imported sources)

    Squid (Argentina, China, India & Thailand)

    Swordfish (imported longlines)

    Tilapia (China)

    Tuna: Albacore (imported except trolls, pole and lines)

    Tuna: Bluefin

    Tuna: Skipjack (imported purse seines)

    Tuna: Yellowfin (longlines except US)3*

    This list can be somewhat confusing and might surprise you, so you do need to do your research. For example,  Albacore Tuna is on both lists but it depends on how it was caught and where. Keep in mind, many tuna are high in mercury but albacore tuna–the kind of white tuna that’s commonly canned- receives a ‘Super Green’ rating but only if it is “troll- or pole-caught” in the US or British Columbia. Younger, smaller fish, (usually less than 20 pounds), are typically caught this way (as opposed to the larger fish caught on long lines). Look for the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) blue eco label to be sure.(2,3)*

    There is a lot of information on this topic and the dos and don’ts of buying fish on the Seafood Watch® app and website. I hope this gives you a taste of what you can do to choose wisely when it comes to buying fish. Keep in mind that Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ helps the body process toxins ingested and helps provide the friendly bacteria we need to keep our guts healthy. Eating a diet high in vegetables, fruits and healthy meats to include fish are part of this regimen. As with all food, we must commit to healthy choices to keep our guts healthy. Choosing the right seafood is just part of this diet. I’ve listed additional resources below for more reading on this topic.*

    Healthiest Wishes,

    Kelli

    www.bodybiotics.com

     

    Resources:

    1. https://www.worldwildlife.org/threats/overfishing
    2. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/ocean-issues/fishing-and-farming-methods
    3. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/
    4. https://newsroom.montereybayaquarium.org/seafood-watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCs1H1dBIYU&feature=youtu.be
    5. https://www.onemedical.com/blog/eat-well/healthy-fish-eating-guide
    6. http://www.seafoodslaveryrisk.org/

    Related Blogs

      No responses yet

      Sep 08 2019

      While the oceans are vast, what swims beneath the surface is limited.

      Published by under General

      While the oceans are vast, what swims beneath the surface is limited.
      Overfishing of sea life is an issue that is affecting not just the fish, but the people who love to eat it.

      In the last few blogs we have talked about water and its importance in our lives, whether we are drinking it or swimming in it. Having clean water quality coming from our tap, in our lakes and oceans and other water supplies is essential to keeping us healthy. Not only is clean water of the utmost importance to us as humans, but to all living things.

      The oceans hold about 96.5% of the earth’s water and are home to a great deal of wild life that is being compromised for a variety of reasons. It’s hard to imagine that in that vast amount of water, that there could possibly be a problem. Because the oceans are so big and so deep, there is an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ mentality for many. Those that explore the world’s oceans, do research and fish them, know the truth. There is a growing pollution problem and there is a finite supply of wild life. 1*

      Just like industrial scale farming, Industrial scale fishing, which began back in the late 1800s, has led to significant declines in the size and abundance of sea life in our oceans. By the middle of the 20th century, natural fish stocks were being depleted faster than they could reproduce.  Despite warnings and news stories, today, ninety percent of the world’s fisheries are “fully exploited, over-exploited or have collapsed.” (1,2)*

      Overfishing, poor management of available resources and the demand and consumption by humans are all contributing factors to declining wild fish populations.  The number of overfished stocks globally has tripled in half a century and today one-third of the world’s assessed fisheries are currently pushed beyond their biological limits, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Overfishing—catching fish faster than they can reproduce—is an urgent issue and is one of the biggest threats to ocean ecosystems1,2)*

      Advanced technology such as radar and sonar systems have made locating fish easier for fisherman. New fishing methods don’t catch a single fish at a time, but allow fisheries to target many fish at once, and too often, other sea life in its path. This unwanted sea life often gets thrown away. “…Many fisheries around the world throw away more fish than they keep—some of the biggest offenders are shrimp fisheries. In the worst cases, for every pound of shrimp caught, up to six pounds of other species are discarded and this incidental catch of unwanted or unsellable species, known as “bycatch,” doesn’t just include fish—turtles, seabirds and other animals also suffer…”(1,2)*

      More than 15 percent of shark species are threatened with extinction due partly to being caught accidentally. Bycatch also includes young fish that are no longer able to grow and breed and therefore rebuild populations. “…Hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, seabirds and marine mammals, including whales, dolphins and porpoises, die as bycatch. As many as 200,000 loggerhead sea turtles and 50,000 leatherback sea turtles are caught annually. Fishing also kills hundreds of thousands of seabirds on longlines, trawls and purse seines.”.(1,2)*

      The biggest fish are the most vulnerable to overfishing. They live a long time and are slow to reproduce. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, of the 465 shark species assessed, 74 are on the vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered list. Unfortunately, the biggest fish are the ones people like to eat.2*

      As the larger fish or higher level predators such as tuna and cod have been depleted, lower level species on the food chain are being targeted. More crabs, sardines and squid are being fished than ever before, but these animals are  important prey for other fish, as well as seabirds and marine mammals, making their removal impactful on other species throughout the ecosystem.2*

      Some of the fishing methods being used include beach and boat seines, dredges and gillnets. These methods trap everything in its path, and drag equipment along the ocean floor, disrupting the entire sea bed’s ecosystem. Starfish, coral, and the entire habitat are disrupted. These are the places that provide shelter, food and breeding grounds for other species. Gillnets, which target salmon, trout, perch and cod, accidentally capture such vulnerable ocean life as sharks, marine mammals and sea turtles. 2*

      Pollution is also threatening our wildlife. Too much trash, especially plastic is mistaken as food and fish and sea birds eat it, with devastating consequences. Many fish that are caught and tested, show to have ingested plastic and chemicals, which we then eat.*

      While management and regulations are in place, Illegal fishing is still a problem. According to International fisheries management agencies, one-fifth of the sea life being caught around the world is illegal, unreported or unregulated. Cheap product brought to the market by fishermen violating domestic or international fishing laws and taking fish outside the scope of an existing management plan, depletes fish stocks and costs honest fishermen and governments millions of dollars by flooding the market with cheap product. Among the violations recorded are fishing in another country’s jurisdiction, taking undersize fish, fishing in closed areas, and using illegal gear, taking more fish than is allocated and illegally transporting seafood from one carrier to another.2*

      And sea life is not the only thing being affected. Billions of people all over the world depend on fish for their main source of protein, and many people make their livelihood from fishing. If the fish we depend on is no longer available, many people will be out of business and many will have to find their food sources elsewhere. Fisherman, who can’t bring in the catch are also suffering. ”…The New England cod fishery has “collapsed,” meaning the population is at 10 percent or less of its historic levels. It has reached a point where recovery may be impossible. When this happens, coastal economies can be devastated…”2*

      This topic is of vital importance to us because fish is one of the healthiest sources of omega 3 fatty acids. The human body can’t make significant amounts of these essential nutrients on it s own, making fish a valuable source of nutrition for us. Fish is a lean fat and a great alternative to other unhealthier meats. It is therefore important that we do our part to protect this resource and get our fish from sustainable sources. Next week we will look at aquaculture, (farming of fish) and other sustainable sources for getting fish, along with what sources to avoid. We will also list the best fish to eat and those to avoid. We’ll also explore Seafood Watch©, a source provided by the Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, California that educates and informs the public on best fishing practices and sustainable sources for getting our fish.

      I hope you find this informative and helpful in making healthy choices for yourself and your family today and for the future. At Body Biotics™, we want to keep you informed so that you can make the best choices for your health. Taking Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ is part of this program, but choosing the right foods is another.

      Healthiest wishes,

      Kelli

      www.bodybiotics.com

      Resources:

      1. https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/how-much-water-there-earth?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects
      2. https://www.worldwildlife.org/threats/overfishing
      3. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/ocean-issues/fishing-and-farming-methods
      4. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/
      5. https://newsroom.montereybayaquarium.org/seafood-watch
      6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCs1H1dBIYU&feature=youtu.be

      14pt; color: #3366ff;”>While the oceans are vast, what swims beneath the surface is limited.
      Overfishing of sea life is an issue that is affecting not just the fish, but the people who love to eat it.

      In the last few blogs we have talked about water and its importance in our lives, whether we are drinking it or swimming in it. Having clean water quality coming from our tap, in our lakes and oceans and other water supplies is essential to keeping us healthy. Not only is clean water of the utmost importance to us as humans, but to all living things.

      The oceans hold about 96.5% of the earth’s water and are home to a great deal of wild life that is being compromised for a variety of reasons. It’s hard to imagine that in that vast amount of water, that there could possibly be a problem. Because the oceans are so big and so deep, there is an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ mentality for many. Those that explore the world’s oceans, do research and fish them, know the truth. There is a growing pollution problem and there is a finite supply of wild life. 1*

      Just like industrial scale farming, Industrial scale fishing, which began back in the late 1800s, has led to significant declines in the size and abundance of sea life in our oceans. By the middle of the 20th century, natural fish stocks were being depleted faster than they could reproduce.  Despite warnings and news stories, today, ninety percent of the world’s fisheries are “fully exploited, over-exploited or have collapsed.” (1,2)*

      Overfishing, poor management of available resources and the demand and consumption by humans are all contributing factors to declining wild fish populations.  The number of overfished stocks globally has tripled in half a century and today one-third of the world’s assessed fisheries are currently pushed beyond their biological limits, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Overfishing—catching fish faster than they can reproduce—is an urgent issue and is one of the biggest threats to ocean ecosystems1,2)*

      Advanced technology such as radar and sonar systems have made locating fish easier for fisherman. New fishing methods don’t catch a single fish at a time, but allow fisheries to target many fish at once, and too often, other sea life in its path. This unwanted sea life often gets thrown away. “…Many fisheries around the world throw away more fish than they keep—some of the biggest offenders are shrimp fisheries. In the worst cases, for every pound of shrimp caught, up to six pounds of other species are discarded and this incidental catch of unwanted or unsellable species, known as “bycatch,” doesn’t just include fish—turtles, seabirds and other animals also suffer…”(1,2)*

      More than 15 percent of shark species are threatened with extinction due partly to being caught accidentally. Bycatch also includes young fish that are no longer able to grow and breed and therefore rebuild populations. “…Hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, seabirds and marine mammals, including whales, dolphins and porpoises, die as bycatch. As many as 200,000 loggerhead sea turtles and 50,000 leatherback sea turtles are caught annually. Fishing also kills hundreds of thousands of seabirds on longlines, trawls and purse seines.”.(1,2)*

      The biggest fish are the most vulnerable to overfishing. They live a long time and are slow to reproduce. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, of the 465 shark species assessed, 74 are on the vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered list. Unfortunately, the biggest fish are the ones people like to eat.2*

      As the larger fish or higher level predators such as tuna and cod have been depleted, lower level species on the food chain are being targeted. More crabs, sardines and squid are being fished than ever before, but these animals are  important prey for other fish, as well as seabirds and marine mammals, making their removal impactful on other species throughout the ecosystem.2*

      Some of the fishing methods being used include beach and boat seines, dredges and gillnets. These methods trap everything in its path, and drag equipment along the ocean floor, disrupting the entire sea bed’s ecosystem. Starfish, coral, and the entire habitat are disrupted. These are the places that provide shelter, food and breeding grounds for other species. Gillnets, which target salmon, trout, perch and cod, accidentally capture such vulnerable ocean life as sharks, marine mammals and sea turtles. 2*

      Pollution is also threatening our wildlife. Too much trash, especially plastic is mistaken as food and fish and sea birds eat it, with devastating consequences. Many fish that are caught and tested, show to have ingested plastic and chemicals, which we then eat.*

      While management and regulations are in place, Illegal fishing is still a problem. According to International fisheries management agencies, one-fifth of the sea life being caught around the world is illegal, unreported or unregulated. Cheap product brought to the market by fishermen violating domestic or international fishing laws and taking fish outside the scope of an existing management plan, depletes fish stocks and costs honest fishermen and governments millions of dollars by flooding the market with cheap product. Among the violations recorded are fishing in another country’s jurisdiction, taking undersize fish, fishing in closed areas, and using illegal gear, taking more fish than is allocated and illegally transporting seafood from one carrier to another.2*

      And sea life is not the only thing being affected. Billions of people all over the world depend on fish for their main source of protein, and many people make their livelihood from fishing. If the fish we depend on is no longer available, many people will be out of business and many will have to find their food sources elsewhere. Fisherman, who can’t bring in the catch are also suffering. ”…The New England cod fishery has “collapsed,” meaning the population is at 10 percent or less of its historic levels. It has reached a point where recovery may be impossible. When this happens, coastal economies can be devastated…”2*

      This topic is of vital importance to us because fish is one of the healthiest sources of omega 3 fatty acids. The human body can’t make significant amounts of these essential nutrients on it s own, making fish a valuable source of nutrition for us. Fish is a lean fat and a great alternative to other unhealthier meats. It is therefore important that we do our part to protect this resource and get our fish from sustainable sources. Next week we will look at aquaculture, (farming of fish) and other sustainable sources for getting fish, along with what sources to avoid. We will also list the best fish to eat and those to avoid. We’ll also explore Seafood Watch©, a source provided by the Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, California that educates and informs the public on best fishing practices and sustainable sources for getting our fish.

      I hope you find this informative and helpful in making healthy choices for yourself and your family today and for the future. At Body Biotics™, we want to keep you informed so that you can make the best choices for your health. Taking Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ is part of this program, but choosing the right foods is another.

      Healthiest wishes,

      Kelli

      www.bodybiotics.com

      Resources:

      1. https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/how-much-water-there-earth?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects
      2. https://www.worldwildlife.org/threats/overfishing
      3. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/ocean-issues/fishing-and-farming-methods
      4. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/
      5. https://newsroom.montereybayaquarium.org/seafood-watch
      6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCs1H1dBIYU&feature=youtu.be

      Related Blogs

        No responses yet

        Aug 25 2019

        Let’s get to the bottom of bottled water

        Published by under Drinking Water,General

        Let’s get to the bottom of bottled water.
        Bottled water is a way of life…see which ones ranked highest in a comparison test and know the environmental impact the plastic is having on our world. (1,2)*

        During our last couple of blogs, we have explored the importance of clean and healthy water, whether we are drinking it or playing in it. It hydrates all things, is life giving and  life sustaining and without it, we couldn’t survive. Because water is so essential to our daily lives and well being, it is essential we get plenty of it and we protect this valuable resource for the future. It is easy to take for granted this readily available resource, but without it, life as we know it would cease to exist. 1*

        Purity of water has gone to the next level with the bottled water industry. There is value in this and there is a problem with this as well. Bottled water is bringing clean water to people in regions around the world where water is undrinkable, and therefore saving lives. But the downside is that plastic water bottles are being consumed at alarming rates… 1 million plastic bottles being purchased every minute—or about 20,000 per second—around the globe. According to market research company Euromonitor International, The Guardian. Less than half get recycled, leaving them to pollute our water ways.  But we have come to depend on them and it is a hard habit to break. (1,2)*

        Bottled water varies in terms of its health value. So which ones are worth the money and which ones are not? It’s in the eye of the beholder. There was a study done that looked at a variety of bottled waters on the market and evaluated which ones are better than others. 1*

        The primary reasons people turn to bottled water are convenience and taste. Regular tap water can have a bad taste and odor because it has to travel a long way through multiple plumbing systems before it gets to us, and so can be inconsistent in taste. Chlorination is an inexpensive and effective way to treat water, but the taste can be off-putting.  Bottled water manufacturers go the distance to make sure the taste is good by using extra filtration and adding a blend of minerals and salts. 1*

        A company called Test Assured decided to put bottled waters to the test. They looked at the different types of water on the market, and broke them down into four categories: 1*

        Spring Water/Artisan Water

        These are the most common of the bottled waters found in grocery stores and retail outlets. While most of these come from underground aquifers, Artisan water is tapped from a well, while spring water is sourced on its way to the surface.  Spring water can also be collected through a borehole.  Some brands undergo filtering or treatment, but not all. 1*

        Sparkling Water

        Two varieties of sparkling bottled water were tested and both brands, Mountain Valley and San Pellegrino, have carbonation added after they are sourced. But they differ in that Mountain Valley is spring water and San Pellegrino is a mineral water.   Mineral waters must meet certain specifications in order to be classified as such, must be naturally sourced and contain 250 or more PPM of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS). 1*

        Reverse Osmosis

        Purified water can come from any number of sources, but most often, it is specially filtered or treated municipal water. One common filtration method is reverse osmosis, which purifies water by pushing it through a semi-permeable membrane using pressure.  The membrane, acting as a filter, traps unwanted particulate.  The result is demineralized and deionized water. 1*

        Vapor Distillation

        Some of the electrolyte waters tested were purified by vapor distillation.  Industrial distillers use large-scale boiling chambers connected by tubes to turn the water into steam. A compressor than condenses the steam back to water and releases it into storage chambers.  Contaminants and minerals are not affected by the temperature, so they remain and when processing is finished, the result is purified water. 1*

        Infused Water

        A popular trend right now is infused water. Water is infused with hydrogen, electrolytes and ozone and the manufacturers of these waters claim that added salts improve athletic performance, while hydrogen boosts energy and endurance and reduce fatigue. Adding ozone makes water the “cleanest and safest water.”  I have tried hydrogen water and it did give me more energy and endurance for the day. But, I’d need to try it several times to become a true believer. 1*

        The tests performed on over 20 brands of water, included one for contaminants which included copper, chlorine, nitrites, and nitrates. While chlorine is safe to add to water as a disinfectant, levels higher than 4ppm come with a risk of increased risk of cancer, asthma and heart problems. Copper, which can leach into water supplies through rocks, soil, and copper piping, should be at levels below 1,300 parts per billion. Too high of levels of copper can lead to gastrointestinal issues and research has linked it to liver damage and kidney disease. Nitrates and nitrites which are found in soil fertilizers sometimes contaminate drinking supplies  “…The EPA recommends nitrate levels under 10 parts per million and nitrite levels under 1 part per million for safe drinking water.  Higher levels can result in developmental issues, blood disorders, and possibly cancer…”1*

        Bottled water companies take extra measures to provide the public with water that doesn’t contain most of these impurities so in the test, they scored well. Tap water can often have high levels of chlorine and nitrates. 1*

        The company also tested for alkalinity levels, which is the water’s ability to neutralize acid. If water is too high in alkaline it can disrupt the body’s pH and cause gastrointestinal issues. Studies show that drinking slightly alkaline water can minimize symptoms caused by acid reflux and other studies have claimed it can slow bone loss. 1*

        Hard water is usually high in calcium and magnesium which result in an unpleasant taste.  The upside is hard water’s mineral content can help you meet your dietary needs for calcium and magnesium. 1*

        Iron is also naturally found in the soil where it is absorbed by rainwater and aquifers and if water has too much iron it can cause an unpleasant taste and cause the growth of harmful bacteria in the water.1*  See how the different bottled waters tested stacked up against each other for these different levels. 1*  

        There are water test kits you can buy to test your own tap and filtered water at home. You can also test for total dissolved solids, using a TDS meter.  “…The amount of total dissolved solids is a measurement of the weight of all solids that are dissolved in the water.  These solids can include minerals, salts, metals, cations, or anions…”  While a high TDS reading doesn’t always indicate poor water quality, it also reflects levels of minerals and salts in the water.  These occur naturally in some waters and manufacturers sometimes add them to purified water to improve taste.1*

        So why do you drink bottled water? Convenience? Taste? Health? Before you purchase these products, think about the environmental impact plastic water bottles are having on our environment. According to Ecowatch.com, about “…480 billion plastic bottles were purchased globally in 2016 but less than half gets recycled, meaning most of this waste ends up in our oceans and landfills. Even worse, the report notes that the world’s increasing thirst for bottled beverages, especially in economically growing Asian countries, will bump these figures up another 20 percent, or 583.3 billion bottles, by 2021—fueling a crisis that experts believe will be as serious as climate change…”2*

        According to researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology, in “…Lake Michigan alone, an equivalent of 100 Olympic-sized pools full of plastic bottles get dumped into the lake every year. Like in the oceans, the plastic trash in the Great Lakes breaks down into microplastics, which are consumed by fish and other aquatic life and moves up the food chain…”2*

        You can still get clean water through home filtration systems and using reusable bottles that you simply wash after use and use the again. Recycle all plastic when able. Many airports are installing water filling stations where you can refill your own bottle. When you are done with your Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™, please recycle our bottles too! *

        Healthiest wishes,

        Kelli

        www.bodybiotics.com

         

        Resources:

        1. https://watertestingkits.com/ultimate-bottled-water-test/
        2. https://www.ecowatch.com/plastic-bottle-crisis-2450299465.html

         

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          Aug 11 2019

          Know what’s beneath the surface before jumping in that beautiful ocean or lake.

          Published by under Drinking Water

          Know what’s beneath the surface before jumping in that beautiful ocean or lake.
          Don’t let contaminated water spoil your fun this summer.   

          There is nothing more delightful than jumping in the cool ocean or a refreshing lake during the height of summer. It’s a sure way to cool off, experience pure joy, and forget about life for awhile. Beneath that surface is a beautiful silent world teeming with vegetation and a variety of fish and other critters. Protecting these bodies of water is crucial so that we may continue to enjoy them for years to come.

          Swimmers beware. There are some unwanted critters swimming around that we cannot see. And for that reason, it is important to take precautions when hitting the beach, lake or pool this summer to make sure you leave as healthy as you came. *

          Have you ever experienced an ear infection, sinus infection or stomach bug after swimming in the ocean, lake or a swimming pool? There may be a very good reason for this. “…Research, done by the Environment America Research and Policy Center, analyzed 2018 bacteria testing data from more than 4,500 beaches in 29 coastal and Great Lakes states as well as Puerto Rico. The results showed that 2,620 sites had at least one day of fecal contamination higher than the Environmental Protection Agency’s “Beach Action Value.”…”1*

          With this level of contamination, the EPA estimates that 32 out of every 1,000 swimmers may catch some sort of illness, be it respiratory or stomach “…Swimming in contaminated water causes up to 57 million illnesses each year, according to researchers…” For that reason, the EPA recommends that in cases of contamination, the public should be made aware through posted warning signs to forewarn swimmers of the possible risk. Yet, the decision to post warnings are made at the local level, and each state has its own beach safety standards. So even though beachgoers may be at risk, the beaches won’t be closed if a state doesn’t follow the Beach Action Value, or follow a higher threshold for safety.(1,2,3)*

          “…Our data doesn’t tell us why the beaches are polluted, but we know that sewage overflows and storm water runoff tend to happen in large metropolitan areas. When it rains, the water has nowhere to go on developed landscapes like parking lots and sidewalks. It runs off into the street, pulling bacteria and chemicals along with it. That contaminated rainwater flows into the nearest waterway, or into the sewer. In some large cities, that’s enough to overwhelm the sewer system, which releases raw, untreated sewage. That, too, flows to the nearest waterway…”2*

          So what happens if you swim in contaminated water? What should you look for? And how can you avoid it? First of all, don’t swallow the water. Don’t open your eyes under water, and try not to get it up your nose. Here are some of the problems you might encounter from swimming in water with high bacteria levels: (1,2)*

          Digestive Problems are the more commonly reported ailment by those after swimming in contaminated water, usually due to a parasite like cryptosporidium or girardia. Norovirus, E. colii or shigella can also cause digestive troubles. (1,2)*

          You can get Conjunctivitis (also known as pink eye) by swimming in the same pool with someone who has it. Pink eye  makes your eyes turn red, swell up and excrete a yellow fluid. Also caused by chemicals, pool chlorine can sometimes lead to a mild version. (1,2)*

          For those that spend lots of time in the water, Swimmers Ear can be a problem. The skin breaks down more easily when it is moist and allows bacteria to move in. (1,2)*

          Beware of hot tubs too. If you breathe in a bacteria called legionella, you can get a type of pneumonia called legionellosis or Legionnaire’s Disease. This germ can thrive in unclean hot tubs and is inhaled through mist or steam. It’s one of the most common waterborne illnesses in the U.S. (1,2)*

          If after a long soak in a hot tub you get itchy, bumpy, red spots, or Hot Tub Rash, you may have been exposed to a germ called Pseudomonas aeruginosa. High temperatures break down chemicals like chlorine faster than in a regular pool, which makes hot tubs a hot bed for this bacteria. Showering with soap immediately after being in a hot tub and washing your swim suit will help prevent this rash. (1,2)*

           

          Harmful Algae Blooms (HABs) happen when algae plants grow out of control in either oceans or fresh water, releasing toxins. Every U.S. state with a coastline has had them. These can give you diarrhea, rashes and lung problems. If an area looks scummy or foamy, avoid it. Also, look for signs warning of HABs. (1,2)*

           

          Swimmer’s Itch is caused by a tiny parasite that lives in both fresh and saltwater which burrows into the skin and causes a rash called cercarial dermatitis. It comes from infected snails, and you’re more likely to find these in shallow water near the shoreline. Avoid marshy places and always rinse off after you’ve been in a lake or ocean. (1,2)*

           

          Leptospirosis are bacteria that live in lakes and rivers where infected animals have urinated. The germs enter your body through your eyes, nose, mouth, or a cut.  More common in warmer climates and where flooding from heavy rains occur, symptoms include diarrhea, red eyes, headache, fever, and jaundice (yellowish skin or eyes caused by a problem with your liver). (1,2)*

          There are certain organisms that live in warm coastal waters that can get in an open wound or cut and cause an infection called Vibriosis. Vibrio vulnificus, are sometimes called “flesh-eating bacteria” and though very rare, it can cause skin ulcers and lead to serious problems, especially if your immune system is weak. Therefore, avoid swimming in contaminated ocean water if you have a cut, scrape, or recent tattoo.(1,2)*

          Take these precautions to avoid waterborne diseases:

          • Look for signs that may be posted regarding high levels of bacteria or other contamination in the water
          • Don’t  go into lakes, rivers, oceans, swimming pools or hot tubs if you have an open wound
          • Take a shower after going in the water
          • Stay out of the water if you have diarrhea to protect others
          • Avoid water that looks murky or discolored or that has a strong chemical smell
          • Keep your immune system strong by taking Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ so you are less likely to be affected by bad bacteria that you encounter. We are less vulnerable when our immune systems are strong!

          Enjoy the rest of your summer, play in the water, but please be safe doing it!

          Healthiest wishes,

          Kelli

          www.bodybiotics.com

          Resources:

          1. https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/news/20190723/report-warns-of-water-pollution-at-us-beaches
          2. https://www.epa.gov/beaches/learn-what-affects-human-health-beach
          3. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2018-12/documents/national-beach-guidance-2014-factsheet.pdf

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            Jul 28 2019

            Just how Important is Clean Water

            Published by under Drinking Water

            The Importance of Clean Water.
            Whether you are drinking it or swimming in it, pay attention to your water.

            Water, water, everywhere. It is essential for life and all living things. Our bodies are made up of up to 60 % water. The brain and heart are made up of 73% water and the lungs 83% water. The skin contains 64% water while the muscles and kidneys are comprised of 79%. Even the bones contain 31% water.(1,2)*

            In order to survive, we must consume a certain amount of water daily.This varies depending on our age, and gender and where we live. Men, on average need about 3 liters daily, while adult women need about 2.2 liters. We get it not only from drinking water and other liquids, but we also get it from the food we eat. Without water, we get dehydrated, which can be fatal if it goes too long.We can go several days without food, but remove water, and we are goners. The same goes for animals, plants and all living things. (1,2)*

             While water keeps us hydrated, it goes much deeper than that. It fills our cells  and regulates our internal body temperature. Carbohydrates and proteins a protective barrier for a developing fetus. It lubricates our joints and helps our mouths to form saliva. It plumps our skin and keeps our eyes moist. (1,2)

            Water has the ability to dissolve many substances which allows our cells to absorb  valuable nutrients and minerals. When we take Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™, it takes water to make the dehydrated friendly critters come alive and flourish in our digestive system. It also takes water to flush waste from our bodies through urination. The more water we drink, the more we flush.Drinking plenty of water keeps us from getting constipated which helps us avoid getting hemmoroids and it minimizes bloating. It helps to detox our systems. Drinking plenty of water aids in weight loss as well. It also helps prevent kidney stones. If we don’t drink enough water, it literally affects every bodily system. So drink lots! Especially during the hot summer months and when we are exerting ourselves. We sweat, causing us to lose water. So it must be replenished at a greater level during these times. (1,2)*

            It’s important to drink clean water. But as water travels through the world, it picks up contaminanats, impurities, chemicals and bacteria that can not only make the water taste bad, but also cause illness. Water treatment plants clean our water, but it is still exposed to chemicals, bacteria and other minerals as it makes its way to yoru faucets.3*

            Water treatment plants kill harmful bacteria, filter out pesticides and larger particles. They add fluoride back into the water, in small amounts. But many take it a step further and get home filtration systems that clean out many contaminants. There are many types of water purifiers on the market, but the most well known and commonly used are activated carbon filters. Charcoal,  a very porous form of carbon, has a large internal surface area that traps contaminates. The larger particles stick to the outside surface, removing sediment from the water. Carbon also acts like a magnet and attracts compounds like lead and VOCs, trapping contaminants internally as the water passes through the filter. Chlorine and other chemicals are reduced via a chemical reaction when water first contacts carbon.

            Alkaline water systems add potassium, magnesium, calcium and sodium back into the water. According to Eddie Diaz, at Blue Jug Alkaline Water in Austin, these essential minerals get stripped from the water by all the filtration processes. Drinking alkaline water “…dissolves acids in the blood with four main components: calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium, which together keep the body running properly and healthy. With all the acidic foods, coffee, alcohol, air pollution that we taken in, our bodies tend to be more acidic. Drinking alkaline water helps balance the body’s pH…” Alkaline water can help neutralize the acid in your bloodstream, and possibly prevent disease. Disease loves an acidic environment and eating and drinking more alkaline foods and water can help correct your pH levels…” Body Biotics™ pH perfect™ is another good way to do this…just add this powder to your water.*

            As with most things, too much of a good thing can cause harm. The same with water. Water intoxication or poisoning is when brain function becomes disrupted as a result of drinking too much water. This happens because we increase the amount of water in the blood, which dilutes the electrolytes, namely sodium. When our sodium levels fall too low, we develop a condition called hyponatremia. In this case, fluids shift from being outside the cell to inside the cell, causing them to swell and when this occurs with brain cells, it can be life threatening. So, drink your recommended amount of water each day. 3*

            There are a lot of different bottled waters available to purchase. From flavored water to water imported from Figi. In a later blog, we will look at which ones are better, and which ones are not worth the money.

            The water you choose to splash in is also important, and this summer there have been reports of our country’s beaches having water too polluted to swim in. A new report found that this pertained to almost 60% of the country’s water tested beaches at least once last year. In fact, 85% of the gulf coast beaches and 75% of Great Lakes beaches were unsafe for swimming at least once last year.4*

            Lakes and swimming holes can have the same problem. Swimming pools that are not properly tested and maintained can also have unhealthy levels of bacteria. So if there is a question about how safe the water is, think carefully before going in. Oceans, rivers, lakes, and ponds can get things from animals, sewage spills, runoff from rainstorms, or other swimmers. And while chlorine kills most of the germs in places like pools, hot tubs, and splash fountains, it doesn’t work instantly. Next  time, we will look a little more in depth at what some of the things to look for when swimming and what can be lurking out there.4*

            So while we are surrounded by water, we have to have it to exist and are 60% waters ourselves, we all must do our part to keep the water as clean as possible. Respect the laws regarding dumping chemicals and paints. Avoid using or overusing pesticides on yards that can lead to run off into our water supply. Push for laws that protect our water supplies. We are part of a beautiful eco system and water is such an essential part of this system for the health not only of ourselves but also for our planet.

            Healthiest wishes,

            Kelli

            Resources:

            1. https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects
            2. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/313681.php
            3. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318619.php
            4. https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/news/20190723/report-warns-of-water-pollution-at-us-beaches

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              Jul 14 2019

              Let’s slow this medicine train down

              Published by under General

              Let’s slow this medicine train down.
              The constant bombardment of drugs from a marketing and medical perspective are causing some  health care practitioners to reassess the direction of medicine and prescription drugs.*   

              In our last blog, we explored the world of functional medicine. Functional medicine asks the questions, ‘ Why do you have this problem to begin with?’ ‘How do we get to the core of the problem?’ And ‘How do we restore loss of function?’ Functional Medicine, includes dietary changes, exercising and working as a partner with your health care practitioner to create a health plan individualized for your needs, genetics and chemistry. It is about making behavioral changes so that we live not only a healthy life, but a life full of vitality. According to Dr. Herbst, with the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine,  “Functional Medicine is not a quick fix. It’s a process. It takes work and an active patient, or it won’t be successful. (1,2)*

              This is a different approach than that of Conventional Medicine where health issues are matched with a particular drug to best manage the condition. While we can’t group all practitioners into one basket. Periodically, it is good for all of us to  assess our own health and review our own drug list, if there is one. How many prescriptions are you on? Can a discussion take place with your health care practitioner to cut down that list? Is there a lifestyle change that can take its place?  So often people get on a particular medication, and just keep taking it, because they were told to do so. Setting time aside to talk you’re your primary care provider about what you are on, and if you can get off of it, are all good questions. Less is sometimes best when it comes to prescription drugs. As Hippocrates said, “to do nothing is also a good remedy.”(1,2)*

              There are some physicians out there who espouse reductions in treatment. They see the over prescribing and the overmarketing of prescription drugs in our society. And they believe we can curtail this onslaught of treatment. They call themselves “medical conservatives.” 3*

              According to Medical Conservatives “…We appreciate progress and laud scientific gains that have transformed once-deadly diseases, such as AIDS and many forms of cancer, into manageable chronic conditions. And in public health, we recognize that reducing exposure to tobacco smoke and removal of trans fats from the food supply have contributed to the secular decrease in cardiac event rates. Indeed, medical science has made this era a great time to live. The medical conservative, however, recognizes that many developments promoted as medical advances offer, at best, marginal benefits. We do not ignore value. In a plot of spending vs. outcomes, we define marginal advances as “flat of the curve” gain. On the flat part of the curve, additional spending, whether it be on a new drug, device, or diagnostic test, confers little benefit to individual patients or society. We resist the urge to conflate benefits of a therapy to a population vs. benefit to the individual.  The medical conservative knows that even when clinical studies show that a drug, device, or surgery reaches a statistical threshold, the actual benefit derived by an individual can be far less than what is advertised or publicized…” (3,4)*

              A recent book takes this a step further. It questions the way and amount that prescription drugs are being prescribed in today’s medical world. The author of Medical Nihilism is Jacob Stegenga, a philosopher of science at the University of Cambridge. Published  by Oxford University Press, it takes a serious and critical look at today’s medicine.  He suggests that many of today’s  treatments don’t work all that well and more importantly,  may be doing more harm than good. (3,4)*

              “…Skepticism toward medicine, sometimes called “therapeutic nihilism,” was once widespread, even among physicians,” Stegenga notes. He sites that in 1860 Oliver Wendell Holmes, Dean of Harvard Medical School, wrote that “if the whole materia medica, as now used, could be sunk to the bottom of the sea, it would be all the better for mankind—and all the worse for the fishes.”…”  But when real cures and solutions were introduced to include  anesthesia, vaccines and antiseptic surgical techniques, along with truly effective treatments such as antibiotics for infectious disease and insulin for diabetes, criticism eased. 4,5)*

              It is the widespread consumption of certain drugs that are being heavily marketed to the public by the drug companies that he says are “…”barely effective and have many harmful side effects.”…” Drugs that treat metabolic syndrome to include  high cholesterol, depression,  hypertension and  type-two diabetes are often over prescribed. Diseases that can often be avoided by a healthy gut and healthy lifestyle. (3,4)*

              The author isn’t suggesting to get rid of medications, but instead to “…improve medicine, aligning it with what rigorous research actually reveals about the pros and cons of treatments. ..”(3,4)*

              He adds “…” there are a handful of truly amazing medical interventions, many discovered between seventy and ninety years ago. However, by most measures of medical consumption—number of patients, number of dollars, number of prescriptions—the most commonly employed interventions, especially those introduced in recent decades, provide compelling warrant for medical nihilism.”…”(3,4)*

              How we got here? Among the reasons he sites are:   

              Medical research is eager for positive results   When people are sick, they are desperate to be cured, and can be   prone to “the placebo effect.” Likewise, journals are anxious to print ‘good medical news’ for the public to read. Researchers get accolades when treatments are effective. Yet  “…conflicts of interest abound…” in medical research and according to Stegenga, “the rigor of research on medical treatments is inversely proportional to the benefits it finds.”  Lastly, the majority of research is sponsored by biomedical firms, who stand to earn billions from the approval of a single drug. ( 3,4)*

              The harmful effects of drugs tend to be underreported.  Too often, the benefits of a drug are overrated and the safety problems are downplayed or ignored. There is little to no data on patients who withdraw from studies due to adverse reactions to a drug.  This leads to a medications harmful affects being revealed only after it has been approved by regulatory agencies. According to one study, “…harms are underestimated  by 94 percent in post-approval surveillance…”4*

              Disorders are invented and common conditions pathologized.  The author refers to this as  “disease-mongering,” when common disorders now  have a name and a plethora of treatments being marketed to address them. This includes such things, according to the author, as restless leg syndrome, halitosis, ADHD, erectile dysfunction, male balding and premenstrual dysphoric disorder, osteoporosis and social anxiety disorder.(3,4)*

              Screening doesn’t save lives. Instead, it can lead to“false positive diagnoses, overdiagnosis and overtreatment.” With the advancements in technology and screening, every little thing is caught and now has the potential for treatment, whether it is necessary or not. (3,4)* 

              While Stegenga admits that the title of his book  “Medical Nihilism” sounds pretty severe, he hopes it will catch people’s attention. Another phrase he uses is  “gentle medicine,”  which calls for less emphasis on cures and more on care. (3,4)*

              Which brings us back to Functional Medicine and Conservative Medicine. Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ is part of the daily care we take to ensure a healthy microbiome and a strong immune system. Our Body Genesis™ when taken on a daily basis, provides essential minerals and vitamins we might be lacking. Our pH Perfect helps balance acidity and alkalinity and our Liquid B 6-9-12 drops provide the hard to get B Vitamins so essential for managing the stressors of our lives. Addressing our health at the core and staying healthy prevents disease and prescription medicines down the road. Listen to your health care provider, but be part of the conversation, ask questions, and take procactive steps to be your own best steward of your health. *

              Healthiest wishes,

              Kelli

              www.bodybiotics.com

              Resources:

              1. https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-6014/The-5-Principles-of-Functional-Medicine.html
              2. https://chriskresser.com/what-is-functional-medicine/
              3. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/medical-nihilism-9780198747048?cc=us&lang=en&
              4. https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(19)30167-6/fulltext
              5. https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/cross-check/is-medicine-overrated/

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