Sep 08 2019

While the oceans are vast, what swims beneath the surface is limited.

Published by at 12:32 pm under General

While the oceans are vast, what swims beneath the surface is limited.
Overfishing of sea life is an issue that is affecting not just the fish, but the people who love to eat it.

In the last few blogs we have talked about water and its importance in our lives, whether we are drinking it or swimming in it. Having clean water quality coming from our tap, in our lakes and oceans and other water supplies is essential to keeping us healthy. Not only is clean water of the utmost importance to us as humans, but to all living things.

The oceans hold about 96.5% of the earth’s water and are home to a great deal of wild life that is being compromised for a variety of reasons. It’s hard to imagine that in that vast amount of water, that there could possibly be a problem. Because the oceans are so big and so deep, there is an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ mentality for many. Those that explore the world’s oceans, do research and fish them, know the truth. There is a growing pollution problem and there is a finite supply of wild life. 1*

Just like industrial scale farming, Industrial scale fishing, which began back in the late 1800s, has led to significant declines in the size and abundance of sea life in our oceans. By the middle of the 20th century, natural fish stocks were being depleted faster than they could reproduce.  Despite warnings and news stories, today, ninety percent of the world’s fisheries are “fully exploited, over-exploited or have collapsed.” (1,2)*

Overfishing, poor management of available resources and the demand and consumption by humans are all contributing factors to declining wild fish populations.  The number of overfished stocks globally has tripled in half a century and today one-third of the world’s assessed fisheries are currently pushed beyond their biological limits, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Overfishing—catching fish faster than they can reproduce—is an urgent issue and is one of the biggest threats to ocean ecosystems1,2)*

Advanced technology such as radar and sonar systems have made locating fish easier for fisherman. New fishing methods don’t catch a single fish at a time, but allow fisheries to target many fish at once, and too often, other sea life in its path. This unwanted sea life often gets thrown away. “…Many fisheries around the world throw away more fish than they keep—some of the biggest offenders are shrimp fisheries. In the worst cases, for every pound of shrimp caught, up to six pounds of other species are discarded and this incidental catch of unwanted or unsellable species, known as “bycatch,” doesn’t just include fish—turtles, seabirds and other animals also suffer…”(1,2)*

More than 15 percent of shark species are threatened with extinction due partly to being caught accidentally. Bycatch also includes young fish that are no longer able to grow and breed and therefore rebuild populations. “…Hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, seabirds and marine mammals, including whales, dolphins and porpoises, die as bycatch. As many as 200,000 loggerhead sea turtles and 50,000 leatherback sea turtles are caught annually. Fishing also kills hundreds of thousands of seabirds on longlines, trawls and purse seines.”.(1,2)*

The biggest fish are the most vulnerable to overfishing. They live a long time and are slow to reproduce. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, of the 465 shark species assessed, 74 are on the vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered list. Unfortunately, the biggest fish are the ones people like to eat.2*

As the larger fish or higher level predators such as tuna and cod have been depleted, lower level species on the food chain are being targeted. More crabs, sardines and squid are being fished than ever before, but these animals are  important prey for other fish, as well as seabirds and marine mammals, making their removal impactful on other species throughout the ecosystem.2*

Some of the fishing methods being used include beach and boat seines, dredges and gillnets. These methods trap everything in its path, and drag equipment along the ocean floor, disrupting the entire sea bed’s ecosystem. Starfish, coral, and the entire habitat are disrupted. These are the places that provide shelter, food and breeding grounds for other species. Gillnets, which target salmon, trout, perch and cod, accidentally capture such vulnerable ocean life as sharks, marine mammals and sea turtles. 2*

Pollution is also threatening our wildlife. Too much trash, especially plastic is mistaken as food and fish and sea birds eat it, with devastating consequences. Many fish that are caught and tested, show to have ingested plastic and chemicals, which we then eat.*

While management and regulations are in place, Illegal fishing is still a problem. According to International fisheries management agencies, one-fifth of the sea life being caught around the world is illegal, unreported or unregulated. Cheap product brought to the market by fishermen violating domestic or international fishing laws and taking fish outside the scope of an existing management plan, depletes fish stocks and costs honest fishermen and governments millions of dollars by flooding the market with cheap product. Among the violations recorded are fishing in another country’s jurisdiction, taking undersize fish, fishing in closed areas, and using illegal gear, taking more fish than is allocated and illegally transporting seafood from one carrier to another.2*

And sea life is not the only thing being affected. Billions of people all over the world depend on fish for their main source of protein, and many people make their livelihood from fishing. If the fish we depend on is no longer available, many people will be out of business and many will have to find their food sources elsewhere. Fisherman, who can’t bring in the catch are also suffering. ”…The New England cod fishery has “collapsed,” meaning the population is at 10 percent or less of its historic levels. It has reached a point where recovery may be impossible. When this happens, coastal economies can be devastated…”2*

This topic is of vital importance to us because fish is one of the healthiest sources of omega 3 fatty acids. The human body can’t make significant amounts of these essential nutrients on it s own, making fish a valuable source of nutrition for us. Fish is a lean fat and a great alternative to other unhealthier meats. It is therefore important that we do our part to protect this resource and get our fish from sustainable sources. Next week we will look at aquaculture, (farming of fish) and other sustainable sources for getting fish, along with what sources to avoid. We will also list the best fish to eat and those to avoid. We’ll also explore Seafood Watch©, a source provided by the Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, California that educates and informs the public on best fishing practices and sustainable sources for getting our fish.

I hope you find this informative and helpful in making healthy choices for yourself and your family today and for the future. At Body Biotics™, we want to keep you informed so that you can make the best choices for your health. Taking Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ is part of this program, but choosing the right foods is another.

Healthiest wishes,

Kelli

www.bodybiotics.com

Resources:

  1. https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/how-much-water-there-earth?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects
  2. https://www.worldwildlife.org/threats/overfishing
  3. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/ocean-issues/fishing-and-farming-methods
  4. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/
  5. https://newsroom.montereybayaquarium.org/seafood-watch
  6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCs1H1dBIYU&feature=youtu.be

14pt; color: #3366ff;”>While the oceans are vast, what swims beneath the surface is limited.
Overfishing of sea life is an issue that is affecting not just the fish, but the people who love to eat it.

In the last few blogs we have talked about water and its importance in our lives, whether we are drinking it or swimming in it. Having clean water quality coming from our tap, in our lakes and oceans and other water supplies is essential to keeping us healthy. Not only is clean water of the utmost importance to us as humans, but to all living things.

The oceans hold about 96.5% of the earth’s water and are home to a great deal of wild life that is being compromised for a variety of reasons. It’s hard to imagine that in that vast amount of water, that there could possibly be a problem. Because the oceans are so big and so deep, there is an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ mentality for many. Those that explore the world’s oceans, do research and fish them, know the truth. There is a growing pollution problem and there is a finite supply of wild life. 1*

Just like industrial scale farming, Industrial scale fishing, which began back in the late 1800s, has led to significant declines in the size and abundance of sea life in our oceans. By the middle of the 20th century, natural fish stocks were being depleted faster than they could reproduce.  Despite warnings and news stories, today, ninety percent of the world’s fisheries are “fully exploited, over-exploited or have collapsed.” (1,2)*

Overfishing, poor management of available resources and the demand and consumption by humans are all contributing factors to declining wild fish populations.  The number of overfished stocks globally has tripled in half a century and today one-third of the world’s assessed fisheries are currently pushed beyond their biological limits, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Overfishing—catching fish faster than they can reproduce—is an urgent issue and is one of the biggest threats to ocean ecosystems1,2)*

Advanced technology such as radar and sonar systems have made locating fish easier for fisherman. New fishing methods don’t catch a single fish at a time, but allow fisheries to target many fish at once, and too often, other sea life in its path. This unwanted sea life often gets thrown away. “…Many fisheries around the world throw away more fish than they keep—some of the biggest offenders are shrimp fisheries. In the worst cases, for every pound of shrimp caught, up to six pounds of other species are discarded and this incidental catch of unwanted or unsellable species, known as “bycatch,” doesn’t just include fish—turtles, seabirds and other animals also suffer…”(1,2)*

More than 15 percent of shark species are threatened with extinction due partly to being caught accidentally. Bycatch also includes young fish that are no longer able to grow and breed and therefore rebuild populations. “…Hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, seabirds and marine mammals, including whales, dolphins and porpoises, die as bycatch. As many as 200,000 loggerhead sea turtles and 50,000 leatherback sea turtles are caught annually. Fishing also kills hundreds of thousands of seabirds on longlines, trawls and purse seines.”.(1,2)*

The biggest fish are the most vulnerable to overfishing. They live a long time and are slow to reproduce. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, of the 465 shark species assessed, 74 are on the vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered list. Unfortunately, the biggest fish are the ones people like to eat.2*

As the larger fish or higher level predators such as tuna and cod have been depleted, lower level species on the food chain are being targeted. More crabs, sardines and squid are being fished than ever before, but these animals are  important prey for other fish, as well as seabirds and marine mammals, making their removal impactful on other species throughout the ecosystem.2*

Some of the fishing methods being used include beach and boat seines, dredges and gillnets. These methods trap everything in its path, and drag equipment along the ocean floor, disrupting the entire sea bed’s ecosystem. Starfish, coral, and the entire habitat are disrupted. These are the places that provide shelter, food and breeding grounds for other species. Gillnets, which target salmon, trout, perch and cod, accidentally capture such vulnerable ocean life as sharks, marine mammals and sea turtles. 2*

Pollution is also threatening our wildlife. Too much trash, especially plastic is mistaken as food and fish and sea birds eat it, with devastating consequences. Many fish that are caught and tested, show to have ingested plastic and chemicals, which we then eat.*

While management and regulations are in place, Illegal fishing is still a problem. According to International fisheries management agencies, one-fifth of the sea life being caught around the world is illegal, unreported or unregulated. Cheap product brought to the market by fishermen violating domestic or international fishing laws and taking fish outside the scope of an existing management plan, depletes fish stocks and costs honest fishermen and governments millions of dollars by flooding the market with cheap product. Among the violations recorded are fishing in another country’s jurisdiction, taking undersize fish, fishing in closed areas, and using illegal gear, taking more fish than is allocated and illegally transporting seafood from one carrier to another.2*

And sea life is not the only thing being affected. Billions of people all over the world depend on fish for their main source of protein, and many people make their livelihood from fishing. If the fish we depend on is no longer available, many people will be out of business and many will have to find their food sources elsewhere. Fisherman, who can’t bring in the catch are also suffering. ”…The New England cod fishery has “collapsed,” meaning the population is at 10 percent or less of its historic levels. It has reached a point where recovery may be impossible. When this happens, coastal economies can be devastated…”2*

This topic is of vital importance to us because fish is one of the healthiest sources of omega 3 fatty acids. The human body can’t make significant amounts of these essential nutrients on it s own, making fish a valuable source of nutrition for us. Fish is a lean fat and a great alternative to other unhealthier meats. It is therefore important that we do our part to protect this resource and get our fish from sustainable sources. Next week we will look at aquaculture, (farming of fish) and other sustainable sources for getting fish, along with what sources to avoid. We will also list the best fish to eat and those to avoid. We’ll also explore Seafood Watch©, a source provided by the Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, California that educates and informs the public on best fishing practices and sustainable sources for getting our fish.

I hope you find this informative and helpful in making healthy choices for yourself and your family today and for the future. At Body Biotics™, we want to keep you informed so that you can make the best choices for your health. Taking Body Biotics™ Bio-Identical SBO Probiotics Consortia™ is part of this program, but choosing the right foods is another.

Healthiest wishes,

Kelli

www.bodybiotics.com

Resources:

  1. https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/how-much-water-there-earth?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects
  2. https://www.worldwildlife.org/threats/overfishing
  3. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/ocean-issues/fishing-and-farming-methods
  4. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/
  5. https://newsroom.montereybayaquarium.org/seafood-watch
  6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCs1H1dBIYU&feature=youtu.be

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